Old Calendar Orthodox Daily Digest for 9/14/2021

Fasting Guidelines

13th Week after Pentecost. Tone three.
Today is fast-free!

Today’s Commemorations

  • Church New Year.
  • Venerable Symeon Stylites (the Elder) (459) and his mother St. Martha (428).
  • Virgin-martyrs Tatiana and Natalia (1937).
  • Martyr Aeithalas of Persia (380).
  • Holy Forty Virgin-martyrs : Laurencia the deaconess, Celsina, Theoclia, Theoctista, Dorothy, Eutychia, Thecla, Aristaineta, Philadelphia, Mary, Veronica, Euthymia, Lamprotatia, Euphymia, Theodora, Theodota, Teteia, Aquilina, Theodulia, Aplodora, Lampadia, Procopia, Paula, Junilla, Ampliana, Percissa, Polynicia, Maura, Gregoria, Cyria, Bassa, Callinica, Barbara, Cyriacia, Agathonica, Justa, Irene, Matrona, Timothea, Tatiana, and Anna, and Martyr Ammon the deacon, their teacher, at Heraclea in Thrace (321-3).
  • Martyrs Callista and her brothers Evodus and Hermogenes , at Nicomedia (309).
  • Righteous Joshua the Son of Nun (1400 B.C.).
  • Venerable Dionysius the Lesser (before 556) ( Romania ).
  • Synaxis of the Most Holy Theotokos in Miasena Monastery, in memory of the finding of Her Icon (864).
  • “Chernigov-Gethsemane” (1869) , Alexandria, August (1914) and named “All-Blessed” at Kazan Icons of the Most Holy Theotokos.
  • Venerable Meletius the Younger of Thebes (1095-1124).
  • New Martyr Angelis of Constantinople (1680) (Greek).
  • Venerable Nicholas of Courtaliatis in Crete, monk (1670) (Greek).
  • Venerable Symeon of Lesbos (Greek).
  • St. Evanthia (Greek).
  • St. Verena of Zurzach (350) (Switzerland).
  • St. Aegidius of Camargue (590) (Gaul).
  • St. Haido of Stanos (1820-21).
  • Commemoration of the Great Fire at Constantinople about 470 A.D.

Scripture Readings

1 Timothy 2:1-7 (Epistle, New Year)
Therefore I exhort first of all that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks be made for all men, for kings and all who are in authority, that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and reverence. For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Savior, who desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth. For there is one God and one Mediator between God and men, the Man Christ Jesus, who gave Himself a ransom for all, to be testified in due time, for which I was appointed a preacher and an apostle-I am speaking the truth in Christ and not lying-a teacher of the Gentiles in faith and truth.

Luke 4:16-22 (Gospel, New Year)
So He came to Nazareth, where He had been brought up. And as His custom was, He went into the synagogue on the Sabbath day, and stood up to read. And He was handed the book of the prophet Isaiah. And when He had opened the book, He found the place where it was written: The Spirit of the LORD is upon Me, Because He has anointed Me To preach the gospel to the poor; He has sent Me to heal the brokenhearted, To proclaim liberty to the captives And recovery of sight to the blind, To set at liberty those who are oppressed; To proclaim the acceptable year of the LORD.” Then He closed the book, and gave it back to the attendant and sat down. And the eyes of all who were in the synagogue were fixed on Him. And He began to say to them, “Today this Scripture is fulfilled in your hearing.” So all bore witness to Him, and marveled at the gracious words which proceeded out of His mouth. And they said, “Is this not Joseph’s son?”

Colossians 3:12-16 (Epistle, St. Simeon)
Therefore, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, put on tender mercies, kindness, humility, meekness, longsuffering; bearing with one another, and forgiving one another, if anyone has a complaint against another; even as Christ forgave you, so you also must do. But above all these things put on love, which is the bond of perfection. And let the peace of God rule in your hearts, to which also you were called in one body; and be thankful. Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom, teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord.

Matthew 11:27-30 (Gospel, St. Simeon)
All things have been delivered to Me by My Father, and no one knows the Son except the Father. Nor does anyone know the Father except the Son, and the one to whom the Son wills to reveal Him. Come to Me, all you who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take My yoke upon you and learn from Me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For My yoke is easy and My burden is light.

Saints and Feasts Celebrated Today

Venerable Symeon Stylites (the Elder) (459) and his mother St. Martha (428).
Venerable  Symeon Stylites  (the Elder) (459) and his mother St. Martha (428). The Monk Simeon the Stylite was born in the Cappadocian village of Sisan in the Christian family of Susotian and Martha. At 13 years of age he began to tend his father’s flock of sheep. To this his first obedience he concerned himself attentively and with love. One time, having heard in church the Gospel commands of the Beatitudes, he was struck by their profundity. Not trusting to his own immature judgement, he turned therefore with his questions to an experienced elder. The elder readily explained to the lad the meaning of what he had heard and it strengthened in him finally the resolve to follow the Gospel path. Instead of heading homewards, Simeon set off to the nearest monastery and, after tears of entreaty, he was accepted after a week into the number of the brethren. When Simeon became age 18, he took monastic vows and devoted himself to feats of the strictest abstinence and of unceasing prayer. His zealousness – beyond strength for the other monastic brethren – so alarmed the hegumen (abbot) that he suggested to the monk that he either moderate his ascetic deeds or leave the monastery. The Monk Simeon thereupon withdrew from the monastery and settled himself by day upon a very high column, where he was able to carry out his austere vows unhindered. After some time, Angels appeared in a dream vision to the hegumen, which commanded him to bring back Simeon to the monastery. The monk however did not long remain at the monastery. After a short while he settled into a stony cave, situated not far from the village of Galanissa, and he dwelt there for three years, all the while perfecting himself in monastic feats. One time, he decided to spent the entire Forty-day Great Lent without food and drink. With the help of God, the monk endured this strict fast. From that time he always completely refrained during the entire period of the Great Lent even from bread and water – twenty days he prayed while standing, and twenty days while sitting – so as not to permit the corporeal powers to relax. A whole crowd of people began to throng to the place of his efforts, wanting to receive healing from sickness and to hear a word of Christian edification. Shunning worldly glory and striving again to find his lost solitude, the monk chose a yet unknown mode of asceticism. He went up a pillar 4 meters in height and settled upon it in a little cell, devoting himself to intense prayer and fasting. Reports about the Monk Simeon reached the highest church hierarchy and the imperial court. The Antioch Patriarch Domninos II ((441-448) visited the monk, made Divine Liturgy on the pillar and communed the ascetic with the Holy Mysteries. Fathers pursuing asceticism in the wilderness all heard about the Monk Simeon, who had chosen such a difficult form of ascetic striving. Wanting to test the new ascetic and determine whether his extreme ascetic feats were pleasing to God, they dispatched messengers to him, who in the name of these desert fathers were to bid the Monk Simeon to come down from the pillar. In the case of disobedience they were to forcibly drag him to the ground. But if he offered obedience, they were entrusted in the name of the desert fathers to bless his continued ascetic deeds. The monk displayed complete obedience and deep Christian humility.       The Monk Simeon was brought to endure many temptations, and he invariably gained the victory over them – relying not on his own weak powers, but on the Lord Himself, Who always came to him in help. The monk gradually increased the height of the pillar on which he stood. His final pillar was 40 cubits in height. Around him was raised a double wall, which hindered the unruly crowd of people from coming too close and disturbing his prayerful concentration. Women in general were not permitted beyond the fence. In this the monk did not make an exception even for his own mother, who after long and unsuccessful searchings finally succeeded in finding her lost son. Not having gained a farewell, she thus died, nestled up to the fence encircling the pillar. The monk thereupon asked that her coffin be brought to him; he reverently bid farewell to his dead mother – and her dead face then brightened up with a blissful smile.       The Monk Simeon spent 80 years in arduous monastic feats – 47 years of which he stood upon the pillar. God granted him to accomplish in such unusual conditions an indeed apostolic service – many pagans accepted Baptism, struck by the moral staunchness and bodily toughness which the Lord bestowed upon His servant.       The first one to learn of the end of the monk was his close pupil Anthony. Concerned that his teacher had not appeared to the people over the course of 3 days, he went up upon the pillar and found the dead body stooped over at prayer (+ 459). The Antioch Patriarch Martyrios performed the funeral of the monk before an huge throng of clergy and people. They buried him not far from the pillar. At the place of his ascetic deeds, Anthony established a monastery, upon which rested a special blessing of the Monk Simeon.

Martyr Aeithalas of Persia (380).
Martyr  Aeithalas  of Persia (380). The Holy Martyr Haifal the Deacon by order of the Persian emperor Sapor II was killed by stoning in the year 380, for confessing the Name of Christ.

“Chernigov-Gethsemane” (1869) , Alexandria, August (1914) and named “All-Blessed” at Kazan Icons of the Most Holy Theotokos.
The “All-Blessed” or “Pamakarista” Icon of the Mother of God was sent in 1905 by His Holiness the Patriarch of Constantinople Joakim III in blessing and solace to the city of Kazan. This icon – an exact copy from a particularly venerated icon of the Mother of God situated in the Constantinople Patriarchal church, which is an uniquely ancient holy thing at Constantinople remaining intact from various plunderings.

Venerable Meletius the Younger of Thebes (1095-1124).
Venerable Meletius the Younger of Thebes (1095-1124).  He was born in Cappadocia around 1035. He became a monk in Constantinople, but after a few years he went on pilgrimage to Jerusalem and Rome, then settled at a small monastery near Thebes. Here Meletios became known for his piety: he wore one garment of woven horsehair and, as the Synaxarion says, ‘never let his eyelids slumber without having bathed the mat he lay on with his tears.’ After twenty-eight years of ascetical labors Meletius, seeking to escape his increasing renown, departed the monastery, eventually settling near the Monastery of the Bodiless Powers near Myoupolis in Greece. Here he thought that he would be able to pray in obscurity, but once again the fame of his virtues attracted a monastic community around him. By order of the Patriarch of Constantinople he was ordained to the priesthood and, much against his will, made abbot of the monastic colony. The Emperor Alexander Comnenus wished to give a large gift of money to the monastery, but the Saint, unwilling to store up wealth on earth, would only accept enough for the essential needs of his monks: ‘but’ (the Synaxarion says) ‘as a sign of gratitude, he protected the pious Emperor in all his campaigns from that time forth, by his prayer.’ After many years caring for the monastery, in which he revealed gifts of healing, insight and prophecy, Saint Meletios reposed in peace, aged about seventy years, sometime between 1095 and 1124.

Church New Year.
On this day, when the Jews celebrated the new summer, the Savior, came to Nazareth where He was brought up and entered the synagogue on the Sabbath day as was His custom, and read these words of the Prophet Isaiah: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me because he has anointed Me … to proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord” (Luke 4, 18:19). On the first of September 312 the Emperor Constantine the Great won a victory over Maxentius. After this Christians were granted complete freedom to confess their faith. In commemoration of these two events the fathers of the First Ecumenical Council decided to begin the New Year on the first of September (See January 1, March 1 and the Paschalia). In its hymns for this day the Holy Church prays “Creator and Fashioner of all things visible and invisible” “bless the crown of the year”, “grant fruitful seasons and rains from heaven for those on earth”, “bless our comings and goings, direct the works of our hands and grant us forgiveness of offences”, “grant peace to Thy churches”, “overthrow heresies”, “protect our cities unbesieged, make glad our faithful Sovereigns by Thy power, giving them victories against enemies”.

Holy Forty Virgin-martyrs : Laurencia the deaconess, Celsina, Theoclia, Theoctista, Dorothy, Eutychia, Thecla, Aristaineta, Philadelphia, Mary, Veronica, Euthymia, Lamprotatia, Euphymia, Theodora, Theodota, Teteia, Aquilina, Theodulia, Aplodora, Lampadia, Procopia, Paula, Junilla, Ampliana, Percissa, Polynicia, Maura, Gregoria, Cyria, Bassa, Callinica, Barbara, Cyriacia, Agathonica, Justa, Irene, Matrona, Timothea, Tatiana, and Anna, and Martyr Ammon the deacon, their teacher, at Heraclea in Thrace (321-3).
The 40 Holy Virgins and Saint Ammunos the Deacon, who enlightened them with the light of the Christian faith, died as martyrs for Christ under the Roman emperor Licinius at the beginning of the IV Century in the Macedonian city of Adrianopolis. The governor Babdos subjected the holy martyrs to many torments, so as to force them to renounce Christ and worship idols. After cruel tortures they were all sent off to Herakleia to another torturer, before whom also they firmly confessed their faith in Christ and refused to worship idols. By order of the torturer, Saint Ammunos and 8 virgins with him were beheaded, 10 virgins were burnt, six of them died after red-hot iron was put into their mouths, six were stabbed with knives, and the rest were killed with swords.

Martyrs Callista and her brothers Evodus and Hermogenes , at Nicomedia (309).
The Holy Martyrs Callista and her brothers Euodos and Hermogenes, Christians of Nikomedia, were brought to trial before the pagan governor for confessing their faith in Christ. Having refused to offer sacrifice to idols, they were cut down by the sword (+ 309).

Righteous Joshua the Son of Nun (1400 B.C.).
Saint Jesus Son of Navin (Joshua) after the death of the Prophet Moses was leader of the Israelite People. He conquered the Promised Land and brought upon it the Hebrew nation. The Lord worked a great miracle through Jesus Navinus. The Jews went across the River Jordan as though on dry land, the Archistratigos [Leader of the Heavenly Hosts] Michael appeared to Jesus Navinus, and the walls of the city Jericho – besieged by the Israelites – fell down by themselves after the Ark of the Covenant was carried around the city during the course of seven days. Finally at the time of the battle with the enemy, Jesus Navinus, by the will of God, halted the motion of the sun and prolonged the day until that moment when victory was won. After the end of the war, Jesus Navinus divided the Promised Land among the 12 Tribes of Israel. He died at 110 years of age (XVI Century B.C.), in his last will commanding the nation to preserve the Law of Moses. All these events are recounted in the Book of Jesus Navinus (Joshua) (Chapters 3, 5, 6, 10), which is included within the Holy Bible.

Synaxis of the Most Holy Theotokos in Miasena Monastery, in memory of the finding of Her Icon (864).
During the persecution of the Emperor Leo the Isaurian against the Holy Icons, the wonderworking image depicting the Synaxis of the Theotokos and found in the Miasini Monastery in Armenia was thrown into Lake Azurov. Within 100 years after the restoration of icon veneration, this holy icon appeared in the year 864 completely unharmed on the surface of the water. The feast is established in memory of this appearance that happened on September 1.

New Martyr Angelis of Constantinople (1680) (Greek).
He was a goldsmith living in Constantinople. While he was celebrating the Dormition of the Theotokos with some friends in a nearby village, the party was joined by some Turkish neighbors. The Christians and Turks drank a great amount together, and at one point entertained themselves by exchanging headgear. The next day, when everyone had sobered up, a Turk asked Angelis why he was not wearing a Muslim turban, for wearing it once was a sign of conversion. (To our knowledge this is not Islamic law, but was a ploy to pressure the young Angelis into conversion.) The dismayed Angelis was brought before a judge and given the choice of converting to Islam or being put to torture and death. Though the young man had shown little seriousness about his faith before this, he was filled with the Holy Spirit and boldly confessed Christ, willingly accepting a Martyr’s end. He was beheaded on Sunday, September 1, 1680.

Commemoration of the Great Fire at Constantinople about 470 A.D.
We commemorate the great fire in Constantinople that occurred during the reign of Leo the Great about the year 470. It was a terrible fire that continued for six months. The Emperor frightened by the disaster left for the sea and built a Temple of St. Mamas in Sigma.

Additional Saints and Feasts Celebrated Today

Virgin-martyrs Tatiana and Natalia (1937).

Venerable Dionysius the Lesser (before 556) ( Romania ).

Venerable Nicholas of Courtaliatis in Crete, monk (1670) (Greek).

Venerable Symeon of Lesbos (Greek).

St. Evanthia (Greek).

St. Verena of Zurzach (350) (Switzerland).

St. Aegidius of Camargue (590) (Gaul).

St. Haido of Stanos (1820-21).

Today’s Hymns

Indiction, Troparion , Tone II
O Fashioner of all creation,
Who in Thine authority hast
appointed the times and seasons:
bless Thou the crown of the year with Thy
goodness, O Lord,
pre­serving in peace Orthodox Christians and Thy city,
and
save us through the prayers of the Theotokos.

Troparion of the Venerable Father Symeon in Tone I
Thou wast a pillar of patience, O venerable one,
emulating
the forefathers:
Job, in afflictions; Joseph in temptations,
and the life of
the incorporeal ones while in the body.
Entreat Christ God. O Symeon, our
father,
that our souls be saved.

Troparion To the Theotokos in Tone I
Rejoice, O highly-favoured Virgin Mary,
haven and
intercession of the human race,
for from thee was the Deliverer of the world
incarnate,
for thou alone art Mother and Virgin,
ever-blessed and most
glorified.
Entreat Christ God to grant peace unto the whole world.

Kontakion of the Indiction in Tone II
O Christ our King, Who livest in
the highest,
Creator of all things visible and invisible,
Who hast fashioned
days and nights seasons and years:
bless Thou now the crown of the year;

preserve and keep in peace Orthodox hierarchs,
this city and Thy people, O
greatly Merciful One.

Download today’s octoechos HERE.

Download today’s menaion HERE.

Courtesy of St. Sergius Church


Hymns, Readings, Feast Day, and Fasting Information provided by Holy Trinity Orthodox Church.

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