Old Calendar Orthodox Daily Digest for 5/27/2022

Fasting Guidelines

Fifth Week of Pascha. Tone four.
Fast. Fish Allowed

Today’s Commemorations

  • Martyr Isidore of Chios (251).
  • St. Isidore , fool-for-Christ, wonderworker of Rostov (1474).
  • New Hieromartyr Peter priest (1939).
  • Venerable Nicetas , bishop of Novgorod and recluse of the Kiev Caves (1108).
  • Martyr Maximus , under Decius (250).
  • Venerable Serapion the Sindonite, monk, of Egypt (542).
  • St. Leontius , patriarch of Jerusalem (1175).
  • Trebensk (1654) and Yaroslavl (Pechersk) Icons of the Mother of God (1823).
  • New Martyr John-Raiko of Shumena, Bulgaria (1802)) (Greek).
  • New Martyr Mark of Crete, at Smyrna (1643) (Greek).
  • First opening of the relics (1846) of St. Tikhon of Zadonsk (1783).
  • St. Aprunculus, bishop of Clermont in Gaul (Gaul).
  • Sts. Alexander, Barbarus, and Acolythus, martyred at the Church of Holy Peace by the Sea in Constantinople (Greek).
  • St. Andrew, abbot of Raphael (Tobolsk) (1820).

Scripture Readings

Acts 15:5-34
But some of the sect of the Pharisees who believed rose up, saying, “It is necessary to circumcise them, and to command them to keep the law of Moses.” Now the apostles and elders came together to consider this matter. And when there had been much dispute, Peter rose up and said to them: “Men and brethren, you know that a good while ago God chose among us, that by my mouth the Gentiles should hear the word of the gospel and believe. So God, who knows the heart, acknowledged them by giving them the Holy Spirit, just as He did to us, and made no distinction between us and them, purifying their hearts by faith. Now therefore, why do you test God by putting a yoke on the neck of the disciples which neither our fathers nor we were able to bear? But we believe that through the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ we shall be saved in the same manner as they. Then all the multitude kept silent and listened to Barnabas and Paul declaring how many miracles and wonders God had worked through them among the Gentiles. And after they had become silent, James answered, saying, “Men and brethren, listen to me: Simon has declared how God at the first visited the Gentiles to take out of them a people for His name. And with this the words of the prophets agree, just as it is written: After this I will return And will rebuild the tabernacle of David, which has fallen down; I will rebuild its ruins, And I will set it up; So that the rest of mankind may seek the LORD, Even all the Gentiles who are called by My name, Says the LORD who does all these things.’ Known to God from eternity are all His works. Therefore I judge that we should not trouble those from among the Gentiles who are turning to God, but that we write to them to abstain from things polluted by idols, from sexual immorality, from things strangled, and from blood. For Moses has had throughout many generations those who preach him in every city, being read in the synagogues every Sabbath. Then it pleased the apostles and elders, with the whole church, to send chosen men of their own company to Antioch with Paul and Barnabas, namely, Judas who was also named Barsabas, and Silas, leading men among the brethren. They wrote this letter by them: The apostles, the elders, and the brethren, To the brethren who are of the Gentiles in Antioch, Syria, and Cilicia: Greetings. Since we have heard that some who went out from us have troubled you with words, unsettling your souls, saying, “You must be circumcised and keep the law” -to whom we gave no such commandment- it seemed good to us, being assembled with one accord, to send chosen men to you with our beloved Barnabas and Paul, men who have risked their lives for the name of our Lord Jesus Christ. We have therefore sent Judas and Silas, who will also report the same things by word of mouth. For it seemed good to the Holy Spirit, and to us, to lay upon you no greater burden than these necessary things: that you abstain from things offered to idols, from blood, from things strangled, and from sexual immorality. If you keep yourselves from these, you will do well. Farewell. So when they were sent off, they came to Antioch; and when they had gathered the multitude together, they delivered the letter. When they had read it, they rejoiced over its encouragement. Now Judas and Silas, themselves being prophets also, exhorted and strengthened the brethren with many words. And after they had stayed there for a time, they were sent back with greetings from the brethren to the apostles. However, it seemed good to Silas to remain there.

John 10:17-28
Therefore My Father loves Me, because I lay down My life that I may take it again. No one takes it from Me, but I lay it down of Myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again. This command I have received from My Father. Therefore there was a division again among the Jews because of these sayings. And many of them said, “He has a demon and is mad. Why do you listen to Him?” Others said, “These are not the words of one who has a demon. Can a demon open the eyes of the blind?” Now it was the Feast of Dedication in Jerusalem, and it was winter. And Jesus walked in the temple, in Solomon’s porch. Then the Jews surrounded Him and said to Him, “How long do You keep us in doubt? If You are the Christ, tell us plainly.” Jesus answered them, “I told you, and you do not believe. The works that I do in My Father’s name, they bear witness of Me. But you do not believe, because you are not of My sheep, as I said to you. My sheep hear My voice, and I know them, and they follow Me. And I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; neither shall anyone snatch them out of My hand.

Saints and Feasts Celebrated Today

Martyr Isidore of Chios (251).
The Holy Martyr Isidor lived during the III Century on the Island of Chios, and was a native of Alexandria. During the first year of rule of the emperor Decius (249-251) there was issued an edict to make a census of all those capable to serve in the armies of the Roman empire. Saint Isidor, tall and strong of body, was drafted into the regiment of the military-commander Numerius. Saint Isidor was a Christian, he led a life of temperance and abstinence, he was chaste and he shunned all the pagan customs. Another imperial edict then commanded, that all the soldiers were to worship the Roman pagan gods and to offer them sacrifice. Not to obey the edict carried the penalty of torture and death. The centurion reported to the military-commander Numerius, that Isidor was a Christian. At the interrogation before Numerius Saint Isidor without flinching confessed his faith in Christ the Saviour and refused to offer sacrifice to idols. Numerius urged the saint not to expose himself to tortures and to obey the will of the emperor, but Saint Isidor answered, that he would obey only the will of the eternal God, Christ the Saviour, and never would he renounce Him. The saint was handed over to torture. During the time of torments he praised Christ God and denounced the pagan idols. The military-commander gave orders to cut out the tongue of the saint, but even after this the saint continued distinctly to give glory to Christ. Numerius in fright fell to the ground and himself lost the gift of speech. Getting up with the help of soldiers, by means of gestures he demanded a small board and on it wrote an order – to cut off the head of Saint Isidor. Saint Isidor welcomed his death sentence with joy and said: “I glorify Thee, O my Master, that by Thy mercy Thou hast accepted me in Thine Heavenly Habitation!” The death of the martyr occurred in the year 251. After execution his body was cast out without burial, but another saint, the secret Christian Ammonios, took up his body and committed it to earth. Later on Ammonios himself accepted a martyr’s death in the city of Kyzikos (Comm. 4 September).       At the beginning of the XII Century the Russian pilgrim Daniel saw the relics of the holy Martyr Isidor on the Island of Chios. His relics were later transferred to Constantinople and placed in the church of Saint Irene.

St. Isidore , fool-for-Christ, wonderworker of Rostov (1474).
Saint Isidor Tverdislov (“Constant of Word”), Fool-for-Christ, Rostov Wonderworker:  He was born in Germany of rich parents and “from his youth” he had “a life unsullied and an understanding compassionate”. Having left his parental home “desiring the Kingdom of God”, Saint Isidor distributed his riches to the poor, and with the staff of a wanderer he went off about many lands and cities (it is unknown where he accepted the Holy Orthodox faith – since he was raised in Catholicism). Finally, he arrived in Russia and he chose the place of his dwelling, Rostov. Here Saint Isidor, “in filth and snow and rain and cold” and “enduring every outrage”, settled in a rickety wooden hut that he himself had made. He chose “a miserable and foolish manner of life as in the Epistle (1 Cor. 4: 10-13)” for the sake of Christ. Saint Isidor spent all his time at unceasing prayer, not giving himself over to “endless drowsing” and “rest”. “He stood at all-night vigil and praise” to render his body “everlastingly to God”. By day the blessed one made his rounds of the city, doing his deed as fool. “Like unto Job of old in patience”, Blessed Isidor in the expression of Holy Church while still alive was “like an earthly angel and an heavenly man”. “Having a soul compassionate, and pure of thought, and vigilant heart and faith unassailed, and true love without pretense”, he was glorified during his life to work miracles. Saint Isidor reposed in the year 1474. They learned about his death only in that passing by his hut they perceived an especial fragrance. At the place of his burial in the city of Rostov was built the church of the Ascension of the Lord, in which through the present his relics rest in a crypt as a source of miracles. Blessed Isidor is termed “Tverdislov” (“Constant of Word”) since that he spoke constantly. [trans. note: the title “Tverdislov” seems unique to Saint Isidor; this supplemental account of him is from the 1900 Bulgakov NaStol’naya Kniga.]

Venerable Nicetas , bishop of Novgorod and recluse of the Kiev Caves (1108).
The Monk Nikita, Hermit of Kievo-Pechersk, Bishop of Novgorod (+ 1109): The memory of Sainted Nikita was earliest celebrated on 14 May by Novgorod, where his relics are situated. The memory of the saint is also celebrated on 31 January, the Day of His Repose, and on 30 April, the Day of the Uncovering of Relics (1558).       The account about him is located under 31 January.

Martyr Maximus , under Decius (250).
The Holy Martyr Maximos suffered under the emperor Decius (249-251). Maximos was a layman and plied the trade of merchant. He was a pious Christian and he led many pagans to faith in Christ the Saviour, and persuaded them to accept Baptism. One time, when the pagans had gathered for offering to their gods an human sacrifice, Saint Maximos plucked up his courage, and unable to bear the sight of such a spectacle, he rushed at them, loudly denouncing their impiety and error, calling the idols soulless creations of mankind. The frenzied pagans stoned the martyr to death.

Venerable Serapion the Sindonite, monk, of Egypt (542).
The Monk Serapion lived during the V Century in Egypt. He was called the Syndonite-wearer since he wore only a coarse linen garb, called a “syndon”. From the time of his youth the monk lived, like the birds of the sky, not having a shelter, and for several days at a time he did not eat, not having the means to buy bread. He gave away his syndon-garb to a beggar, shivering from the cold, and he himself remained half-naked. A certain Greek philosopher, wanting to test the non-covetousness of the monk, one time gave the monk a gold coin and kept an eye on him. The saint went to the bread market, bought with it one loaf of bread, gave the merchant the gold coin and left, having no regard for the exchange value of the money. Saint Serapion by a special path led many on the way of salvation. One time he gave himself over into slavery to a Greek actor, whom he saw fit to convert to Christ. The actor, imitating the example of the holy life of the saint, believed and was baptised together with all his family. He besought Saint Serapion to remain with him not as a servant, but as a guide and friend, but the monk withdrew, not taking any of the money offered him. Having set off to Rome, Saint Serapion got on a ship, but paid nothing to the ship-owners. At first they began to reproach him for this, but noticing that the elder had gone five days already without eating, they began to feed him for the sake of God and in this they fulfilled the command of the Lord. At Rome the monk continued to wander about, going from house to house, having nothing, gathering together only but spiritual wealth for himself and for his neighbour.

St. Leontius , patriarch of Jerusalem (1175).
Saint Leontios, Patriarch of Jerusalem, by the account of Saint Gregory Palamas, was Patriarch during the years 1223-1261. His life was similarly described by Theodore, a monk of Constantinople. This Vita was translated in abridged form from the Greek into the Russian language. It was translated a second time more fully by the Monk Nikodemos of the Holy Mountain, who indicates the death of the Patriarch was instead actually in the year 1175.

Trebensk (1654) and Yaroslavl (Pechersk) Icons of the Mother of God (1823).
The Yaroslavsk (Pechersk) Icon of the Mother of God: In the city of Yaroslavl’ the townswoman Aleksandra Dobychkina suffered terribly for 17 years from emotional and bodily illness. In 1823 she had a vision in her sleep: of a church with an icon of the Mother of God. She decided to seek out the Yaroslavl’ visionary temple and icon. This church turned out to be the temple in honour of the Procession of the Venerable Wood of the Cross of the Lord (Comm. 1 August), situated under the bell-tower of the archbishop’s residence. Entering the church, the afflicted Aleksandra beheld on the wall the depiction of the Kievo-Pechersk Mother of God. Suddenly she had a powerful attack of fever, after which at first there was an onset of relief, and later a full healing from the grievous illness. And from that time began miraculous healings through prayers to the MostHoly Mother of God.

New Martyr John-Raiko of Shumena, Bulgaria (1802)) (Greek).
The Holy Martyr John the Bulgarian was martyred by the Turks as a Christian in the year 1802.

New Martyr Mark of Crete, at Smyrna (1643) (Greek).
The Holy Martyr Mark of Crete was beheaded by the Turks in the year 1643 for confessing faith in Christ.

Additional Saints and Feasts Celebrated Today

New Hieromartyr Peter priest (1939).

First opening of the relics (1846) of St. Tikhon of Zadonsk (1783).

St. Aprunculus, bishop of Clermont in Gaul (Gaul).

Sts. Alexander, Barbarus, and Acolythus, martyred at the Church of Holy Peace by the Sea in Constantinople (Greek).

St. Andrew, abbot of Raphael (Tobolsk) (1820).

Today’s Hymns

Holy Martyr Isidore of Chios, Troparion, in Tone IV
In his suffering, O Lord,
Thy martyr Isidore received an imperishable
crown from Thee our God;
for, possessed of Thy might,
he set at nought the
tormentors and crushed the feeble audacity of the demons.
By his supplications
save Thou our souls.

Download today’s octoechos HERE.

Download today’s menaion HERE.

Courtesy of St. Sergius Church


Hymns, Readings, Feast Day, and Fasting Information provided by Holy Trinity Orthodox Church.

Aggregated and Formatted by OrthoBot OC.

If you benefit from this daily content, please consider Subscribing to my Substack.